D219 Annual Review of Programs 2013-14

Annual Review of Programs 2013-2014

 

Important Dates:

Monday, August 6, 2012 - Comprehensive Annual Review presented to the Board, which includes suggestions and input from students, parents, teachers, administration, and Board of Education members.  Board directs administration to post and share with constituents.
 
Thursday, November 8, 2012 -Principal's Town Hall Meeting Sponsored by the West and North Parent Advisory Committees, Town Hall meeting at Niles North High School at 7:00pm for community discussion.

 
Monday, November 26, 2012 - Document revised to represent administration’s recommendations and presented at the board meeting for discussion.
 
Monday, December 17, 2012 - Board will direct the administration to make the changes as detailed in the finalized document for the 13-14 school year.
 

Annual Review of Programs 2013-2014

 
The following document is part of an annual review of programs and personnel in District 219.  The purpose of this document is to ensure that curricular programs are aligned with the Board of Education’s mission statement and goals, including the Five-Year Strategic Plan, in a fiscally responsible manner.  This document is a working draft that should serve as a catalyst for ongoing discussions among Board of Education members, administrators, teachers, parents and students.  We welcome input and suggestions from all of our constituent groups, and look forward to insightful dialogue with all parties involved.  
 
The following restructuring ideas come from many constituents including, the Board of Education, Administration, Teachers, Parents and Students.  The Board will receive comments via existing structures such as school and district committees, department and building meetings, student government, parent organizations, the online feedback form and the Town Hall meeting on November 8 at 7 p.m. at Niles North High School.  The Board will receive final recommendations from the administration and will discuss the plan on November 26 in open session during the Board meeting.  The Board will officially act on the administration’s recommendations at their Board meeting on December 17.
 
RECOMMENDATIONS TO COMMENCE WITH THE 2013-2014 SCHOOL YEAR:
 
School/District
Considerations:

  • Require a lunch for all students.
  • Set a new calendar for the 2013-14 school year, with final exams ending prior to winter break; school would start the second week of August and end at Memorial Day.
  • Set a new calendar for the 2014-15 school year, with final exams ending prior to winter break; school would start the second week of August (8/12, one week earlier) and end at Memorial Day. Sample Calendar
    • The change was suggested by our own high school students.         
    • High school students will be better able to secure summer work, as school     will be over at the end of May.
    • The new calendar would be congruent with community colleges and     four-year universities, allowing eligible students to begin college second semester of their senior year or take summer college courses.
    • Many D219 high school students are back to school the second week of     August as their sports and activity camps are in full force.
    • High school students will receive a true respite and opportunity for travel with their families during winter break as their projects and final exams will be done.
    • D219 gains approximately five instructional days by not requiring review for final exams after winter break.
    • D219 personnel will be better able to assist students who have failed first semester by having an additional two weeks to communicate with the student and student’s parents about options for second semester.  Currently they have one day to do this work.
    • There would be approximately 10 more days of instruction before students     take AP and ACT/PSAE exams.

 

  • Change name from “Parent-Teacher Conferences” to “Parent-Student-Teacher Conferences” and involve students in the process.
  • Focus on Advanced Placement
    • Establish district guidelines for workload in AP courses consistent with College Board readiness standards.
    • Increase overall enrollment in Advanced Placement from 29% to 50% of students taking at least one AP courses.  Fifty percent of all graduates of the class of 2016 should have taken at least one AP course. 
    • Student enrollment in AP courses should be ethnically and racially representative of the student population. 
    • Examine all course requirements/prerequisites to increase opportunities for advanced, more rigorous coursework.
  • Expand Summer School
    • Construct summer school to serve as a third semester for students, including substantial offerings in core areas.         
    • Offer more academic summer camps and programs that target students with academic potential to prepare them to take our most rigorous and difficult course work.  Examine other models that neighboring districts have implemented for  this purpose.  
  • Core area departments will offer a credit recovery option for students who fail a semester course with a 50-59% grade of F.  Options for recovery include passing the common final exam with a C or better, rather than repeating a course or attending summer school for remediation.  The goal, congruent with Board Goal 2, is to have common finals that accurately test mastery of learning targets linked to college readiness and the common core.
  • Review the allocation of support staff for efficiency.
  • Promote Illinois Virtual High School to our parents and students as a means of credit recovery, advancement, or enrichment.

 
Professional Development
Considerations:

  • Offer D219 University courses in Tech 3 for staff in subject-specific areas, to help staff utilize technology to enhance specific department courses or goals.
  • Offer a D219 University course on teaching in a diverse and multicultural society.
  • Require all tenured teachers to take Assessment for Learning, through restructuring plans, as required by federal and state regulations under No Child Left Behind.  Nontenured teachers will complete AFL during their 4-year professional development plan. 

 
Administration
Considerations:

  • Examine administrative costs; reassign professional technical services work or “coordinator” non-teaching work to existing or new positions in the administration when the cost of the work can be performed for less within the administration.
  • Create a Director of Equity position to meet the district’s goal of ensuring every student, regardless of race, has an equal opportunity to learn and succeed.
    • D219 must ensure that we are providing a quality education to every child, regardless of racial, ethnic or socio-economic background.
    • As we review the academic performance of our students, it becomes ever clearer that some of our students, particularly Black and Latino students, perform significantly lower than their white and Asian counterparts.
    • Black and Latino students are also disproportionately represented in lower track courses and select special education placements.
    • Our minority students are overrepresented in disciplinary actions.
    • Our faculty is not representative of the community we serve.
    • While the district and our schools have put in place a number of different initiatives and interventions to address this unacceptable disparity, the gap still exists.
    • One administrator would be responsible for coordinating the various equity initiatives and interventions throughout the district, including professional development for faculty and staff.
    • Sample Job Description. 

 
AS&T
Considerations:

  • Child development students will utilize Children’s Learning World for the lab portion of the class; community preschool will be eliminated at West. 
  • Review Accounting course - does it meet Level 5 grade weight criteria and rigor?

 

  • Coordinate dual credit and certification coursework options with Oakton Community College in the area of Nutrition.

 
English
Considerations:

  • Combine the English and Social Studies departments into a “Humanities Department” for the 2014-15 school year.  Given that all humanities subjects all align to the same set of Common Core standards, every course in the Humanities department would teach literacy through the medium of their specific subject area, and would be evaluated on literacy standards.  Research, such as the Reading Next Report, shows that cross curricular literacy instruction results in greater student achievement for adolescents.  
  • Offer an honors option in the regular level American Literature and Composition course instead of a segregated honors section.  Any student can opt in and apply for honors level credit, thereby taking advantage of exposure to more rigor in the classroom. Examples where this structure currently exists include World Languages, Fine Arts, and Science.
  • Eliminate Sophomore English 33-43: students do not meet college readiness levels when enrolled in this basic level course.  Create a Tier II reading support for under-performing sophomore readers. 

 
Fine Arts
Considerations:

  • Advanced Studio Art - remove the lab portion of the course in order to increase enrollment.

 
Math
Considerations:

  • Continue with 3-year restructuring program as detailed in Board Strategy 1, offering Algebra 2 with Extension. 
  • Add Mathematical Modeling at North. 

 
Physical Welfare and Athletics
Considerations:

  • Eliminate Lifeguarding course.  Partner with local agencies and the park districts which already offer the certification. 
  • Change grading procedures in Physical Education; focus grading on fitness growth data, such as target heart rate attainment, utilizing Polar output data, fitness testing, etc.  Continue to reinforce the priority of daily fitness. 
  • Review effect of makeup policy and explore different ways to allow students to make up missed work. 
  • Audit impact of VPE on length and substance of athletic practices. 
  • Explore options to reduce the district’s expenditures on drivers education, including advocating a change in state law to eliminate the program, partnering with local companies to offer the program outside D219, and offering drivers education entirely online as currently done in Pennsylvania.  

 
Science
Considerations:

  • As revealed in the statistical analysis of Science curricular offerings, students enrolled in lower-track science courses have only about a 6% chance of attaining college readiness levels.  Therefore, the recommendation, congruent with Board Strategy 1, is to eliminate Physical Science and ILS; all freshman students must take Biology.
  • Require all students to take 3 years of Science as a graduation requirement (Biology, Chemistry, and Physics).  The 3-year requirement may be waived or adjusted by the IEP team for students with special needs.

- Class of 2010 - 92% took 3 years of science; 71% took 4 years of science
- Class of 2011 - 94% took 3 years of science; 73% took 4 years of science

 

  • Coordinate dual credit and certification coursework options with Oakton Community College in the areas of Astronomy, Anatomy and Physiology, STEM Inquiry and Research (SIR), and Gerontology.

 
Social Studies
Considerations:

  • Combine the English and Social Studies departments into a “Humanities Department” for the 2014-15 school year.  Given that all humanities subjects all align to the same set of Common Core standards, every course in the Humanities department would teach literacy through the medium of their specific subject area, and would be evaluated on literacy standards.  Research, such as the Reading Next Report, shows that cross curricular literacy instruction results in greater student achievement for adolescents. 
  • Audit where Government and Civics is being taught; consider adding Government and Civics courses.
  • Offer an honors option in the regular level US History course instead of a segregated honors section. Any student can opt in and apply for honors level credit, thereby taking advantage of exposure to more rigor in the classroom.  Examples where this structure currently exists include World Languages, Fine Arts, and Science. 

 
Special Education
Considerations:

  • Add co-facilitation model of Global Studies in lieu of coteaching, mirroring the math and science models.
  • Add a third year of Science in CIC and CIC-C 
  • Develop and implement goals and expectations for targeted interventions for IIC across the district, e.g., use of the Literacy Center, online remediation, student-teacher meetings, etc.  


Student Services
Considerations:

  • Put in a place a School Based Health Clinic in partnership with local health providers in lieu of the nurses’ office to provide student access to comprehensive pediatric care including wellness education e.g. smoking cessation and weight loss.
  • Provide on-site laboratory and educational experiences in the School Based Health clinic toward certification in biomedical pathways in partnership with Science and AS&T curricula.

 

  • Review current college guidance counseling practices to ensure students are supported and knowledgeable about their best college options, both financial and academic.

 

  • Research cost-effective alternatives to Ombudsman (credit recovery, outsourced placement).  Consider in-house programs or night school.  
  • Add a community service graduation requirement; not as a course, but as a total number of hours to be logged in the student’s ILP ICARE section.  These hours can be completed using organizations outside D219.  
  • Develop a means to deliver a Social-Emotional Learning curriculum (SEL is required by the state). 

 

  • Require an annual proof of residency for every student at the start of each school year.
  • Restructure Nurse office staff. 
  • Develop a plan to address the needs of our undocumented students.
  • Regarding Advanced Placement:
    • Form a district task force of teachers and directors to speak at freshman orientation and to middle school parents, explaining the district’s rationale for wanting to dramatically increase AP participation among all students in the community.
    • Provide communication and assistance to economically disadvantaged students regarding how D219 can assist in the costs of AP exams and fees.

 
World Languages
Considerations:

  • Eliminate the first year honors in French and German.  Spanish, Chinese, and Hebrew do not have this option.  This promotes more students into honors and AP in the long run.
  • Require all students to take at least two years of foreign language, or at least demonstrate proficiency in a second language.